William’s Syndrome

Category:
Developmental Disorder/Genetic Disorder

Prevalence:
In The US: About 1 in 20,000 annually.

Also Called:
Williams-Beuren Syndrome, Elfin Facies Syndrome

Resources:
Cleveland Clinic

U.S. National Library of Medicine

WebMD

 

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William’s Syndrome is a genetic condition that is present at birth. It is caused by the deletion of 26-28 genes around chromosome 7. The condition may cause cardiovascular disease, developmental delays, learning disabilities, elevated blood calcium levels, dental and kidney abnormalities, hernias, sensitive hearing, and musculoskeletal problems. People with William’s Syndrome typically have difficulty with visual-spatial tasks like drawing and assembling puzzles, but they tend to do well on tasks that involve spoken language, music, and learning by repetition.

Affected individuals are also frequently described as friendly, outgoing, and endearing and tend to take a great interest in other people. They may, however, suffer from behavioral and psychological disorders, such as ADD, anxiety, and phobias. With assistance, these men and women can grow to their fullest potential and contribute to society as volunteers and workers in a number of industries.

William’s Syndrome In The News

Mom Shares About Son’s Disability With 1st Graders

Read More    published: 05/23/2017

Wish Granted: Oceano Boy With Rare Syndrome Gets Pizza Party, Trip to Disney World

Read More    published: 10/27/2016

'Unreasonable Mother' Shapes a World That Embraces Disabled Children

Read More    published: 02/25/2015

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