Turner’s Syndrome

Category:
Genetic Disorder

Prevalence:
In The US: About 1 in 2,500 girls.

Also Called:
Monosomy X, Ullrich-Turner Syndrome

Resources:
Mayo Clinic

U.S. National Library of Medicine

WebMD

 

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Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in females. The most common feature of Turner syndrome is short stature, which becomes evident by about age 5. An early loss of ovarian function (ovarian hypofunction or premature ovarian failure) is also very common. The ovaries develop normally at first, but egg cells (oocytes) usually die prematurely and most ovarian tissue degenerates before birth. Many affected girls do not undergo puberty unless they receive hormone therapy, and most are unable to conceive (infertile). A small percentage of females with Turner syndrome retain normal ovarian function through young adulthood.

About 30 percent of females with Turner syndrome have extra folds of skin on the neck (webbed neck), a low hairline at the back of the neck, puffiness or swelling (lymphedema) of the hands and feet, skeletal abnormalities, or kidney problems. One third to one half of individuals with Turner syndrome are born with a heart defect, such as a narrowing of the large artery leaving the heart (coarctation of the aorta) or abnormalities of the valve that connects the aorta with the heart (the aortic valve). Complications associated with these heart defects can be life-threatening.

Most girls and women with Turner syndrome have normal intelligence. Developmental delays, nonverbal learning disabilities, and behavioral problems are possible, although these characteristics vary among affected individuals.

Turner’s Syndrome In The News

There is hope for Tuner Sydrome. Here is my story.

Read More    published: 07/12/2015

After a Prenatal Test Said My Baby Had Turner’s Syndrome I Did Some Investigating. What I Found Was Deeply Disturbing

Read More    published: 03/19/2015

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